breast cancer, family, kids, life, teaching, Uncategorized

A Friday Full of Failure

IMG_8198

An experimental third-person limited series of vignettes about my Friday.

Part 1 -The first failure

It’s 12:30 am, early Friday morning. L can’t sleep again. She lies in bed, reading on her iPad -a sci-fi book, part of a series that catches her imagination. She knows she needs sleep, but her brain will not shut down despite her attempts to relax. She knows she has to be at work in six or so hours. Fleetingly, she thinks about putting in for a substitute, but it’s Friday, and subs are a precious commodity on Fridays. She doesn’t feel right putting in for a sub. She’s not sick. Her kids are not sick. She just can’t sleep. Plenty of people struggle with insomnia and go to work exhausted. It won’t be the first time L’s gone to work after having slept less than six hours. It is what it is. People count on her.

L turns her attention back to the book she’s reading -to have something to focus on besides her fear of dying, fear of cancer, fear of fragility and mortality.

Sometime, in the wee hours of the morning, she drifts into dreams.

Part 2 -The second failure

It’s 6:01 am, Friday morning. The screeching noise from beside her pulls L from sleep. She hits her alarm clock. It takes effort not to burst into tears. The last time she saw the clock, it was 4 am. She thinks she slept some from 2:00 am to 4 am -a fitful sleep, but she thinks she rested a little. She’s not sure about 4 am-6 am. If she slept, it doesn’t feel like it. A tells her to get up. It’s Friday. S has choir practice every Friday morning, and her ride will be there soon. She wishes she had given in and put in for a sub. She knows she won’t be on her “A game” today. She knows she’ll be lucky to be on her “F game.” She goes to dress. As part of her morning routine, a part she knows does her no good, she steps on the scale. The number staring back at her makes her cry. In her head, she hears the words of Dr. O’s nurse practitioner, “We’ve had patients no evidence of disease for ten or more years who gain ten or fifteen pounds and their cancer comes back. You need to watch your weight.” She feels shame because she’s gained ten pounds. She feels fear because her brain tells her the cancer will return and when it does, it’ll be all her fault. She feels anger because her head is being such a scumbag right now. It’s been like that for days now.

She roughly wipes the tears away and jams the heels of her hands into her eyes. “You’re just exhausted,” L tells herself. Maybe she’ll rest this weekend. It’s a busy one, but maybe she can rest more. She steps off the scale and puts a smile on her face as A walks into the bathroom. The fake smile doesn’t fool him. He stands beside her. A critical gleam in his eyes doesn’t quite mask the concern reflecting deep from them. “You have got to sleep. You have got to stop staying up all hours. You need to take a shower at 9:30, be in bed by 10:00, and asleep by 10:30. You need to get your sleeping habits back on track. Part of being healthy means getting enough sleep.”

She stares at A. She wants to scream at him that she needed him to be sympathetic, to hug and hold her, to lend her some of his strength. She didn’t need his cool logic, but that’s what she got. She mumbles that she’s leaving to go to work. She gives hugs to S and AJ, takes her medicine -tamoxifen, Claritin, biotin, Flonase, and gets into her car, starts it, pathetically grateful for the classical music station when the radio comes on because it’s playing a piano piece by Mozart, soothing.

Part 3 -The third failure

For the first time in a long time, walking into work, a place she loves, feels heavy -a burden she doesn’t know if she can carry this morning. Most of her students, her juniors, will not be in class this morning -they’re out taking the APUSH exam. Her first class is Seminar, and they had their exam Thursday afternoon. She knows the seniors and sophomores who show up are going to be tired, ornery. They’ve had a long, disrupted week of AP and state testing.

She unlocks her door, turns on the lights, turns on her coffee maker. The bell rings; students trickle in. She turns on her computer and yawns. The warning bell rings. A few more students trickle in. She tells the students in her room that she’ll be right back as she grabs her coffee cup, it needs washing, and walks to the office.

In the office, L washes her coffee cup. It’s one of her favorites with a black cat that sits with a look in its face with the phrase “You’ve got to be kitten me.” It’s prophetic this morning, not that she knows that yet. She washes her cup, says hello to a substitute teacher she knows well, goes to the ice chest, and puts a few cubes in her coffee cup -she prefers her coffee warm instead of taste bud melting hot. One of the academic counselors comes in and comments, “I heard there was a lot of sleeping in the Seminar exam yesterday.”

L stares at the counselor. Her face flushes red. Her heart sinks. She says, “Oh?” and the counselor nods her head. L walks out of the office, angry, hurt, and runs into a Seminar student she knows and trusts. She asks the student, a junior, if she saw students sleeping. The girls nods. “I’m sorry, Mrs. V. I wasn’t one of them.”

Part 4 -the fourth failure

L fights tears as she walks back to her classroom. She sees her department chair and tells her what just happened and childishly says, “I just want to go home.” L’s department chair squeezes her shoulder.

Standing outside her classroom, L takes a few deep breaths. She knows she’s on the verge of tears. She’s an angry crier, an exhausted crier. She’s exhausted. She’s angry. It’s not professional to cry in front of students, she reminds herself and opens her classroom door. She makes it a few steps inside the room, but she stops. She looks at the very few faces in her room, and the anger bubbles out in quiet condemnation, “You slept? One of the counselors just told me there was a lot of sleeping. You slept?” Students avert their eyes. Some flush an embarrassed red. A few questioning glances dart back and forth, seeking silent answers from unspoken questions. Here and there someone nods, admissions of guilt.

Angry tears flood her eyes, and try as she might, she can’t stop them. “You didn’t try. The only thing I ask is that you try, and you didn’t try. Some of you didn’t even show up.” Tears from anger, from exhaustion roll down her cheek. She’s embarrassed. “We worked so hard,” she whispered. “You didn’t even try.”

She turns, grabs the door knob, and steps outside her room. She needs to compose herself. She knows better than to let something get to her like this. She’s just so tired and so worn out. She sits down, leans against the wall, covers her face with her hands. Her shoulders shake. A few more tears slip. A voice, “Hey, are you ok?” L says she’s fine. The teacher -choir director now- former student of hers once upon a time, sits down beside her. “Mrs. V, what happened?”

She says she’s just tired. It’s been a long, stressful week, and she’s upset knowing some students didn’t even try on the exam. Her former student, colleague now, sits beside her and just listens. Then, she goes inside the classroom while L goes to wash her face.

She sees her department chair and tell her that she just needs to go home to sleep. She can’t face the rest of the day. She’s too tired, too overwrought. Her department chair hugs her and tells her not to worry, she’ll get it worked out. “Go home and rest,” another colleague and friend tells her. “We’ve got this. I’m sorry for whatever is going on. Don’t give here a second thought,” another says. “I’m going to nag you to rest,” says the one who told her to go home and rest. L smiles at this, a watery, sad smile. She goes home.

Part 5 -the last failure on Friday

Exhaustion wins. Friends will cover her second period class. There’s a sub who can cover fourth. So, she goes home, and she sleeps. Finally.

But…

She fails on this Friday.

She fails herself. She fails her colleagues. She fails her students. She fails her administration.

She fails on this Friday.

She fails to be strong. She fails to be confident. She fails to be humble. She fails to be grateful.

She fails on this Friday.

She fails.

But, she will get up. Failing means trying. And all she asks of anyone, including herself, is that they try.

So, she’ll try again.

She’ll fail again.

And so the cycle goes.

Advertisements

1 thought on “A Friday Full of Failure”

  1. Absolutely beautiful. Not just how you write but who you are. I am blessed to be one of the ones that gets to see when you “fail” because that only makes you more of an inspiration. I’m proud to claim you as my teacher and now friend. You are literally one of the strongest and fearless women I have ever met. I only hope one day that I can fail as gracefully and boldly as you do.

    I love you Mrs. V!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s